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Guarding against flooding from high streams and rivers at Wyoming’s fish hatcheries and rearing stations is important to prevent fish disease and aquatic invasive species infestation at the facilities. Wyoming’s hatcheries were built in places with good natural water supply as well as favorable quality and temperatures for raising trout. However, if natural water levels rise, there's a risk of flooding at the hatchery from the nearby streams and rivers.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department conservation engineers design structures and systems to prevent flooding and help keep diseases out. Recently, at the Boulder Rearing Station, Game and Fish engineers oversaw construction of a levy and pump system to prevent flooding from the East Fork River. The project was completed in the summer of 2021 and protects the fall spawning rainbow trout broodstock and numerous other trout species that are raised in outdoor raceways.  

Game and Fish is tackling similar biosecurity projects at the Speas and Clark’s Fork hatcheries, along with a water source project at the Dubois Hatchery. Engineering solutions like these for fish health and aquatic invasive species prevention can last as long as 75 years.

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Photo: The completed flood prevention project at Boulder Rearing Station.

Dan McGillivray, P.E.
Game and Fish Project Engineer, Pinedale

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